Spectrummy Mummy

Asperger's, Allergies, and Adventures Abroad

Posts Tagged ‘travel

Fan

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Back when we first started planning our trip to England, I wasn’t working.  By the time the trip came around, I was employed, and things were busy.  Not only was I new to the job, but the last couple of months are the busiest time of year, and then because of certain organizational changes, and certain people visiting, things were even busier.  There wasn’t time to think in those last few days, let alone pack, prepare the kids, and prepare the office.  Which means it was perfect timing for things to go horribly wrong.

In the week leading up to our departure, Cubby was ill, followed by myself and Spectrummy Daddy in quick succession.  We all recovered, and were feeling well by Friday, the day of departure.  I hadn’t been in the office for long when the call came from Pudding’s school that she was ill.  I raced out to get her, and out to the doctor.  She was feverish, and looked miserable, which was just how I felt.

Pudding was much more defensive than she usually is with the GP- a sure sign that she was ill.  With much patience and coaxing, the doctor managed to assess her, and promptly diagnosed Tonsilitis and a chest infection.  I must have looked how I felt, because the doctor told me she’d give Pudding some medicine, and she’d be fine to travel.  Really?  Yes, because I was her patient too, and she knows how much I needed to get away.  Pudding could be treated, and would soon be back to full health.

I asked our Regional Medical Officer for a second opinion, and he concurred.  The trip was still on, we just had to get the medication inside her.

That was easier written than done.

Pudding refused all medications, both tablet and syrup forms.  We tried mixing it into drinks, we tried bribing her, she refused.  She was not going to take that medicine!  And I wasn’t, I mean I just wasn’t going to put her through that flight without medication.  I couldn’t.  I didn’t voice it out loud, but I mentally prepared myself for not boarding.  Time ticked on, and we were sent to the gate, still without Pudding taking her medicine.

And then I saw it….a Hello Kitty fan!

Now, Hello Kitty is the tops for Pudding in terms of special interests.  But fans are the most stimtastic things for Pudding.  She learned at just a few weeks old that if she screamed if the fan was turned off, we’d turn it back on for her.  I remember Pudding not engaging in most of the assessments during her evaluation because there was a fan in the room, and she just had to keep telling us about it, and staring at it, and spinning like it.  Fans?  Fans are big.  Hello Kitty fans?  Colossal.  I instructed Spectrummy Daddy to furtively buy one.

And moments before boarding, I showed it to her.  She could have it, but she had to take the medicine.  And this time, no fuss, no fight.  She took it all.  Her temperature started to drop immediately.  And for the first time that long day, she was all smiles.

As we passed through the entrance to board the plane, one of the ground staff asked Pudding if it was her magic wand.  And of course, Pudding corrected her that it was a Hello Kitty fan.  She was right, but it was my magic wand.  And to England we did go by the grace of that Hello Kitty fan.  We ended up losing it a week or so later in some motorway services in the north of England with some other Kitty paraphernalia.

I like to think that some magic rubbed off to whoever was lucky enough to hold it next.  Because in spite of that truly turbulent start, the rest of the flight was smooth…and Pudding recovered quickly, and well, I’ll tell you some of the rest of our magical adventures another time.

 

Written by Spectrummy Mummy

September 26, 2012 at 5:19 pm

Wordless Wednesday 19 Sep 12

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A long way from home, wherever that is…

Written by Spectrummy Mummy

September 19, 2012 at 6:25 pm

Making Connections

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As you read this, I will be finishing packing, getting the kids ready, heading to the airport, taking our first flight, making our connection in the busiest airport in the world(!), or on our second 16-hour flight.  Or I’ll be a stranger in a strange land, figuring out what to do next.  At least for me, that is familiar territory.

When Pudding was first diagnosed, I struggled to learn a foreign language littered with phrases like “echolalia” and “proprioception.”  Eventually I became fluent in this new language, even making up my own translations for some of those tricky phrases.  This language would be how I communicated with Pudding’s educators, therapists, and doctors; but to communicate with my girl, I had to learn to speak her language, just as she struggles to learn mine.

During the last two years, I made connections with those who could help me navigate this strange land.  In particular a teacher and doctor whose care and attention extended beyond Pudding to our entire family.  They acted as my guides so I didn’t get too lost.  Eventually I found community resources, and made sense of insurance regulations and somehow managed to find a path to follow.  It wasn’t always the easiest journey, but I could stumble my way along.

I would be lying if I said I’m not intimidated by starting all over again.  Making new connections, and finding trusted professionals who have my family’s best interests at heart.

At least once I began blogging, I found that there were so many of us, we could find our way together.  By reaching out to one another, we make new connections, form a community that doesn’t have geographical boundaries.  I have friends walking the same path, holding my arm if I should happen to stumble.  I’m grateful beyond measure for the friendship and support I’ve found through this blog.

Connections matter.  A few weeks ago a friend from university announced he was going to be the manager of a new independent cinema in England.  I immediately though about how great it would be if they could do the sensory showings that we enjoy here in the US, and suggested to him that they do just that.  He said he’d get back to me, and earlier this week he wrote back saying that when they open later this year, the cinema will be offering sensory showings every three weeks.

If that can be done in the UK, why not South Africa?  Why not everywhere?  We just need to keep making those connections.

I want to thank you for reading, commenting and sharing this blog over the last year.  It has been an incredible journey, that in many ways is only just beginning.  Time for me to go and make my connections.  Time for more adventures abroad!

If you would be so kind, I would love it if you could visit here and vote for Spectrummy Mummy as one of the top autism blogs.  Many thanks!

Written by Spectrummy Mummy

August 1, 2011 at 6:03 am

The Airport

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Own photo

Image via Wikipedia

I think I established in yesterday’s  post that our flight has the potential to go pretty badly.  Pudding has actually flown quite a lot, though not at all since her diagnosis.  She used to love it, and I developed a few tricks for occupying toddlers on a plane.  In fact, when we flew from Europe back to the US, people actually congratulated us on how well Pudding (aged 2 1/2) had behaved on the 10 hour flight.  We know it could just as easily have gone the other way though!

We’re not the first spectrummy family to take a long flight, nor will we be the last.  So rather than continuing to dwell in panic and fear, I’ve decided to take a more proactive approach.

I thought it would be great if we could all share our knowledge about traveling to make it easier.  I’m going to create a little series of posts where I ask you to share your tips.  We can all benefit from one another’s advice.  If you are a blogger, just add your link.  Otherwise, write a comment.  You don’t have to have children on the spectrum to chip in.  Our kids are all pretty different, something that appeals to one can be repellent to another, but you just might have the trick to help a family get through this challenge.  And if your tip helps our family, I will lavish you with gratitude.

Travel is a really huge area to talk about, so why don’t we start with just the airport?  The lovely DQ sent me this link which is a guide to Manchester Airport (UK) for children with ASD.  It is really useful, I would LOVE it if every airport produced something similar, but this would be pretty useful as a guide anyway.  We live less than 30 minutes away from the airport, so we plan on taking a drive out there one weekend to watch the planes, and take photos for a social story.  We also have a Fisher-Price airport playset to role play.  Cubby was only 4 months old on his last flight, so he really doesn’t have the concept down yet.  Playing helps him to prepare for what will happen.

After our last flight, we purchased a trunki ride-on rolling suitcase for Pudding at the airport.  We haven’t flown since, so I can’t vouch for how well it works, but it might alleviate boredom, and is cute enough for kids to want to pull themselves.  My plan is to put her weighted blanket in there, so she could get some good proprioceptive input as she walked around the airport.

Alright, there you have a couple of tips from me about airports, but I’d love to hear some more.  Does anyone have any sage advice for dealing with airport security?  How do you make waiting in queues more bearable?  What helps prevent sensory overload in airports?  Anything you can suggest to help pass the time at the airport?

I’d love your help.  So would Pudding and a lot of kids like her.

Written by Spectrummy Mummy

March 8, 2011 at 7:19 am